Reading for writing (IEM #2)

The reading for my IEM project with Nicholas Isherwood goes in (at least) two directions, the theoretical (coupling of kinaesthetic and cenaesthetic, as mentioned in the previous entry, and a topic for later entries) and the creative. I say creative, because I’m not seeking out text with high literary value, but rather that which will facilitate creating a new work. The initial, and still core, idea is to use everyday expressions that link body and environment. Dead or frozen metaphors as they’re sometimes called. Language as Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “fossil poetry”. Breath of wind. Mouth of the river. Stream of words. And similar expression in languages other than English. Farsi, courtesy of Mo Zareei, presents some twists: Ghorreshe abr (the roar of the cloud), Gerye yeh abr (the tear of the cloud). Indonesian too, thanks to Yono Soekarno: Kaki langit (foot/leg sky – the horizon), Jari mentari (fingers sun – sun rays). Some phrases are common across many languages, and will find a place in the project (navel of the world, heart of stone). In working with such expressions, and their musical and sonic potential, I’m excited by the idea that the piece might follow a path back to the “brilliant image” that Emerson’s fossil poetry is a remnant of.

The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry. As the limestone of the continent consists of infinite masses of the shells of animalcules, so language is made up of images, or tropes, which now, in their secondary use, have long ceased to remind us of their poetic origin. But the poet names the thing because he sees it, or comes one step nearer to it than any other. This expression or naming, is not art, but a second nature, grown out of the first, as a leaf out of a tree.

My focus is not a literary one though, as I’m not seeking to revivify the beings of second nature through language. Rather, I’m hoping to draw attention to the connection between first and second nature, to afford the listener an experience of second nature growing “out of the first.” Sound, music and language growing in and out of each other.

To underpin these metaphors, I’m also seeking out foundational texts (creation myths of one kind of another) which speak directly of the meshing of body and environment, though most often in these the body (or some kind of divine being) magically always already exists and the environment emerges from it.

Puruṣa from the Rig Veda (India)
When they divided Puruṣa how many portions did they make?
What do they call his mouth, his arms? What do they call his thighs and feet?

The Moon was gendered from his mind, and from his eye the Sun had birth

Ovid’s Metamorphoses
Atlas, so huge, became
A mountain; beard and hair were changed to forests,
Shoulders were cliffs, hands ridges; where his head
Had lately been, the soaring summit rose

Pan Gu (Chinese)
P’an-Ku’s bones changed to rocks; his flesh to earth; his marrow, teeth and nails to metals; his hair to herbs and trees; his veins to rivers; his breath to wind; and his four limbs became pillars marking the four corners of the world

The one which most struck me, a creation myth appropriate to the contemporary world, a piece of speculative science, is Plato’s Timaeus.

God took such of the primary triangles as were straight and smooth, and were adapted by their perfection to produce fire and water, and air and earth – these, I say, he separated from their kinds, and mingling them in due proportions with one another, made the marrow out of them to be a universal seed of the whole race of mankind; and in this seed he then planted and enclosed the souls, and in the original distribution gave to the marrow as many and various forms as the different kinds of souls were hereafter to receive. That which, like a field, was to receive the divine seed, he made round every way, and called that portion of the marrow, brain, intending that, when an animal was perfected, the vessel containing this substance should be the head.

Reading this via Lakoff and Johnson’s work (and ignoring the triangles) there seem a number of metaphors at work here. The head is a vessel. The body is a substance (marrow, as the essential substance). But underlying these is the more fundamental image of mankind as both plant and earth – first nature (seed and field) – in and out of which grows second nature – humanity.

And finally, unexpectedly, I came across this from Pierre Schaeffer, one of musique concrète’s most significant inventors:

A shell against your ear will make your blood sing to the rhythm of the sea. This is because there are two universes, similar in every way, separated on by the surface of your skin.

Emerson rephrased? Merleau-Ponty seems a more likely influence. Nevertheless, this might just find a place in the piece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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